Su-27 / T-10 prototypes flying – video and something about!!! – 4 min of joy

May 20, 1977 the first prototype designated T10-1 took off. After an evaluation it was discovered that the T10-1 did not fulfil its requirements for maximum range, and manoeuvrability, and thus proved inferior to its western counterparts. The prototype had aerodynamics problems, engine problems and fuel consumption problems. The second prototype the T10-2 crashed because of a fly-by-wire software failure which resulted in the death of the test pilot. After such disappointing results the from the T10 program Sukhoi seemed to stop T10 development, because there were no more T10 prototypes tested. They didn’t, by 1981 a new design was introduced loosely based on the old T10. The new aircraft was designated T10S which was to become what today is known as the Su27 Flanker. The T10S prototype flew on April 20, 1981. The T10S showed it self to be a masterpiece of engineering having no equal anywhere in the world in range, manoeuvrability, and combat effectiveness.

The Su-27, a Russian fourth-generation single-seat supersonic fighter, is recognised all over the globe as one of the best combat aircraft of the 20th century. Due to its perfect flight performances and operational characteristics, the fighter is rightfully popular with pilots and technicians. Top piloting capabilities of the Su-27 fighter demonstrated during multiple air shows around the world did not leave anyone indifferent. The Su-27 is in the top lines of the aviation record tables of the International
Aircraft Federation. To the date, the Su-27 is a record-holder of 27 world class flight achievements. The Su-27 is the forefather of a combat aircraft family of various functionality, including the Su-27UB trainer, Su-27K ship-borne fighter (Su-33), Su-30 twin-seat interceptor, Su-30MK twin-seat multirole fighter, Su-34 tactical bombers Su-35, Su-37 Su-35BM and other high-manoeuvrability multirole aircraft.

More about T-10 prototype click HERE

Austrian Drakens (SAAB 35) over Alps

The Saab 35 Draken was a Swedish fighter aircraft manufactured by Saab between 1955 and 1974. The Draken was built to replace the Saab J 29 Tunnan and, later, the fighter variant (J 32B) of the Saab 32 Lansen. The indigenous J 35 was an effective supersonic Cold War fighter that was also successfully exported to Austria, Denmark and Finland.

Austrian Air Force received 24 Drakens, and retired them from service.

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Austrian Air Force SAAB-35 Draken

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 15.35 m (50 ft 4 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.42 m (30 ft 10 in)
  • Height: 3.89 m (12 ft 9 in)
  • Wing area: 49.22 m² (529.82 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 7 865 kg (17 340 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 11 400 kg (25 132 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 16 000 kg (35 273 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Volvo Flygmotor RM 6C afterburning turbojet
    • Dry thrust: 56.5 kN (12 787 lbf)
    • Thrust with afterburner: 78.4 kN (17 637 lbf)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: Mach 2.2
  • Range: 3 250 km (2 020 mi) with external drop tanks
  • Service ceiling: 18 000 m (59 000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 175 m/s (34 450 ft/min)
  • Wing loading: 231.6 kg/m² (47.4 lb/ft²)
  • Thrust/weight: 0.70
  • Takeoff roll: 800 m (2 623 ft)

Armament

  • Guns: 1× or 2× 30 mm M-55 ADEN cannon with 100 rounds per gun (in Saab 35F left cannon omitted to fit avionics needed for Falcon missile integration, earlier variants and export variants retained twin guns.)
  • Hardpoints: for fuel tanks or ordnance with a capacity of 2 900 kg (6 393 lb) and provisions to carry combinations of:
    • Rockets: 2× 75 mm air-to-air rocket pods ventrally or 12× 135 mm rockets on six underwing pylons
    • Missiles: Rb 24, Rb 27 and Rb 28 air-to-air missiles
    • Bombs: 55-, 220-, 500-, and 1 000-pound bombs

 

Ukraine Su-27 Flankers with U.S. Air National Guard F-16s

Two U.S. Air National Guard F-16 aircraft, left, fly in formation with two Ukraine SU-27 aircraft over Mirgorod Air Base, Ukraine, July 22, 2011, during Safe Skies 2011. Safe Skies is a joint U.S., Ukraine and Polish exercise during which Air National Guard pilots fly engagements with Ukrainian SU-27, Mig-29s and Polish F-16s in preparation for the 2012 London Olympics and 2012 EUROCup and 2014 Winter Games in Europe. (DoD photo by Master Sgt. James D. Berg, U.S. Army/Released)

SAFE SKIES 2011: A two-week multinational flying event

Admiral Kuznetsov carrier

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Class & type: Admiral of the Fleet of the Soviet Union Kuznetsov-class aircraft carrier
Displacement: 43,000 tons (Standard-load)
55,200 tons (Full-load)
61,390 tons (Max-load)
Length: 305 m (1,001 ft)
270 m (890 ft) 
Beam: 72 m (236 ft)
35 m (115 ft) 
Draft: 10 m (33 ft)
Propulsion: Steam turbines, 8 turbo-pressurised boilers, 4 shafts, 200,000 hp (150 MW)
2 × 50,000 hp (37 MW) turbines
9 × 2,011 hp (1,500 kW) turbogenerators
6 × 2,011 hp (1,500 kW) diesel generators
4 × fixed pitch propellers
Speed: 29 knots (33 mph; 54 km/h)
Range: 8,500 nmi (15,700 km) at 18 kn (21 mph; 33 km/h)
Endurance: 45 days[1]
Complement: 1,690 (total); 1,690 ship’s crew
626 air group
40 flag staff
3,857 rooms
Armament: • 8 × AK-630 AA guns (6×30 mm, 6,000 round/min/mount, 24,000 rounds)
• 8 × CADS-N-1 Kashtan CIWS (each 2 × 30 mm Gatling AA plus 32 3K87Kortik SAM)
• 12 × P-700 Granit SSM
• 24 × 8-cell 3K95 Kinzhal SAM VLS(192 missiles; 1 missile per 3 seconds)
RBU-12000 UDAV-1 ASW rocket launchers (60 rockets)
Aircraft carried: 41–52 aircrafts

  • Fixed Wing;
  • Rotary Wing;
    • 4 × Kamov Ka-27LD32 helicopters
    • 11 × Kamov Ka-27PL helicopters
    • 2 × Kamov Ka-27PS helicopters

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MiG-29K-Flight-Testing

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