NEWS: U.S Navy destroyer USS Ross (DDG-71) Observes the Video Overflight by a Russian Su-24 Fencer Aircraft

“USS Ross (DDG 71) observes the overflight by a Russian Sukhoi Su-24 Fencer aircraft while both were operating in international waters and airspace. Ross continued on her mission after observing the aircraft return to base. At no time did Ross act aggressively nor did she deviate from her planned operations. The conduct of her crew has been and continues to be professional. Ross’ Sailors observed that the SU 24 carried no weapons – wings were “clean.” The U.S. Navy operates ships in the Black Sea on a routine basis, consistent with the Montreux Convention and International Law.” Courtesy Defense Media Activity – Navy.“

About Yakovlev Yak-141 “Freestyle”

The Yakovlev Yak-141 (Яковлева Як-141; NATO reporting name “Freestyle”), also known as the Yak-41, was a supersonic vertical takeoff/landing(VTOL) fighter aircraft designed by Yakovlev. It was used for testing.

Freestyle was first supersonic VTOL aircraft in the world. 

Yak-141 has three engines. The main engine was served by four side-mounted ducts as well as a row of large louvers along the upper surface to allow air to enter the engine during full power hovering. This engine was the R-79V-300, a two-shaft augmented turbofan with a bypass ratio of 1. Maximum thrust was 14,000 kg (30,864 lb). The rear nozzle could rotate from 0 degrees to 95 degrees for VTOL landing and hovering. The two lift engines were the RD-41 design, a simple single-shaft engine made mostly of titanium. Each had a thrust of 4,100 kg (9,040 lb). The engines were installed behind the cockpit at an angle of 85 degrees. Like the Yak-38, the engines received their air through eight spring-operated dorsal flaps, and the exhaust exited through a belly opening covered by two ventral doors.

Yakovlev_Yak-141_at_1992_Farnborough_Airshow_(3)

Yakovlev obtained funding for four prototypes. The first (48-0, with no callsign) was a bare airframe for static and fatigue testing. The second (48-1, call sign “48”) was a non-flying powerplant testbed. The third and fourth (48-2 and 48-3, call signs “75” and “77”) were for flight testing. While 48-1 remained unpainted, 48-2 and 48-3 were painted in overall grey, with a black radome and fin cap antennas.

jakowlew-jak-141.jpg.3254420

Someone can say F-35 is a copy of Yak-141, and there is some truth. Lockheed was involved in this project, believe or not. Yakovlev stayed without funds to test more prototypes like Yak-41M, so they called few foreign companies to help them. Lockheed corporation (U.S.A.) was in the process of developing the X-35 for the US Joint Strike Fighter program then, so it was good for both sides to join knowledge and experience.

With Lockheed assistance, Yak-141 prototype 48-2 was displayed at the Farnborough Airshow in September 1992. Yakovlev announced that they had reached an agreement with Lockheed for funds of $385 to $400 million for three new prototypes and an additional static test aircraft to test improvements in design and avionics. Planned modifications for the proposed Yak-41M included an increase in STOL weight to 21,500 kg (47,400 lb). One of the prototypes would have been a dual-control trainer. Though no longer flyable, both 48-2 and 48-3 were exhibited at the 1993 Moscow airshow. The partnership began in late 1991, though it was not publicly revealed by Yakovlev until 6 September 1992, and was not revealed by Lockheed until June 1994.

Soviet supersonic VTOL Yak-41(141).

First flight of the Yak-141 was on 9 March 1987, program canceled in August 1991.

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 18.36 m (60 ft 2¼ in)
  • Wingspan: 10.105 m (33 ft 1½ in)
  • Height: 5.00 m (16 ft 5 in)
  • Wing area: 31.7 m² (341 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 11,650 kg (25,683 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 19,500 kg (42,989 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Soyuz R-79V-300 ( ru) lift/cruise turbofan
    • Dry thrust: 108 kN (24,300 lbf)
    • Thrust with afterburner: 152 kN (34,170 lbf)
  • Lift engines: 2x RKBM RD-41 (ru) turbojets 41.7 kN (9,300 lbf) thrust each)

yak-141

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 1,800 km/h (1,118 mph, Mach 1.4+)
  • Range: 2,100 km (1,305 mi)
  • Ferry range: 3,000 km (1,865 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 15,500 m (50,853 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 250m/s (15,000 m/min) (49,213 ft/min)

Armament

  • Guns: 1 × 30 mm GSh-301 cannon with 120 rounds
  • Hardpoints: 4 underwing and 1 fuselage hardpoints with a capacity of 2,600 kg (5,733 lb) of external stores and provisions to carry combinations of:
    • Missiles: R-73 Archer, R-77 Adder or R-27 Alamo air-to-air missiles

Yakovlev_Yak-141_at_1992_Farnborough_Videan

FAB-250 M54 bomb

fab-250-hromadne_123Entering service in the early 1950s, this general-purpose bomb could be carried on planes as small as the MiG-17 “Fresco” or as large as the Tu-22M “Backfire”. During the Afghan War, it was even dropped by helicopters. A major limitation was that if carried externally, the plane had to stay subsonic. Unlike the American Mk8x-series dumb bombs, the Soviets never invested in wind-tunnel aerodynamics or ablative coatings for their general use iron bombs. The FAB-250 is one of the most common airborne weapons of the 20th century; the Soviets produced so many that they eventually stopped issuing serial numbers on them. The list of nations that have not used the FAB-250 would be shorter than those who have.

Weight: 565lbs

Warhead: HE unitary

07RussianFAB250M54GeneralPuurposeBombsource: harpoondatabases.com