Su-34 Fullback (Su-27IB / Su-32)

The Su-34 Fullback, also known as Su-27IB or export code name Su-32, was developed by OKB Suhogo/Sukhoi Joint Stock Company. Russian Air Force ordered in first rate 32 jets in 2008., and later place order for 92 jets in 2012.

Russian Air Force received first two Su-34 in December 2006.

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Serial production started in January 2008. Until today (February 2015), Russian Air Force received 65 multi role fighter jets Su-34 Fullbacks, and will not stop on that number.Russian Air Force are in modernization status. Few more years will use Su-24 Fencer as main jet for this role, but plan is that Su-34 take Fencers place here.

 

 

Su-34 is a two seater and designed primarily for tactical deployment against ground and naval targets, on solo and group missions in daytime and at night, under favorable and adverse weather conditions and in a hostile environment with counter-fire and EW counter-measures deployed, as well as for air reconnaissance. Because it is based on the Su-27 family, it can also carry out air-to-air missions (interception/air superiority/dogfight), as a secondary role.

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The Su-34 replaces for Tu-23M and Su-24 aircraft. Su-34 is one of a number of Russian aircraft, Su-30, Su-33 and Su-35, which are based and developed from the Su-27 Flanker.

The Su-34 design retains the basic layout and construction of the Su-27 airframe, with a conventional high-wing configuration and a substantial part of the onboard equipment. The Su-34 has a changed contour of the nose section to accommodate an advanced multi-mode phased array radar with terrain following and terrain avoidance modes. It has a two-seat rather than single-seat cockpit. The capacity of the internal fuel tanks has been increased with a resulting increased take-off weight. Changes have been made to the central tail boom for a rear-facing radar.

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The Su-34’s most distinctive feature is the unusually large flight deck. Much of the design work went into crew comfort. The two crew members sit side by side in a large cabin, with the pilot-commander to the left and navigator/operator of weapons to the right in NPP Zvezda K-36dm ejection seats. An advantage of the side by side cockpit is that duplicate instruments are not required for each pilot. Since long missions require comfort, the pressurization system allows operation up to 10,000 metres (32,800 ft) without oxygen masks, which are available for emergencies and combat situations. The crew members have room to stand and move about the cabin during long missions. The space between the seats allows them to lie down in the corridor, if necessary.A toilet and a galley are located behind the crew seats.Entrance into the cockpit is from below, using a ladder attached to the nose landing gear and a hatch in the cockpit floor. The cockpit is a continuous capsule of armour.

Maximum detection major range for the forward radar is 200–250 km (to review the rear another, aft-mounted, radar is used). The main radar can simultaneously attack the 4 targets (in the air, on land or on the water). The rear warning radar system can warn of attack from behind and it can also attack from behind, without turning the aircraft. Radar defence the rear as claimed unofficially this N-012 radar.

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 23.34 m (72 ft 2 in)
  • Wingspan: 14.7 m (48 ft 3 in)
  • Height: 6.09 m (19 ft 5 in)
  • Wing area: 62.04 m² (667.8 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 22,500 kg (49,608 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 39,000 kg (85,980 lb)
  • Useful load: 12,000 kg  (26,455 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 45,100 kg (99,425 lb)
  • Powerplant: 2 × 13,500 kgf (132 kN, 29,762 lbf) afterburning thrust Lyulka AL-31FM1turbofans
  • Internal fuel: 12,100 kg (15,400 l)

Performance

  • Maximum speed:
    • High altitude: Mach 1.8+ (≈2,000 km/h, 1,200 mph)
    • Low altitude: Mach 1.2 (1,400 km/h, 870 mph) at sea level
  • Cruise speed: unknown
  • Range: 1,100 km (680 mi) at low level altitude
  • Combat radius: 1,000+ km (about 680 mi)
  • Ferry range: 4,000 km (2,490 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 15,000 m (49,200 ft)
  • Thrust/weight: 0.68

Armament

  • Guns: 1× 30 mm GSh-30-1 (9A-4071K) cannon, 150–180 rounds
  • Hardpoints: 12× wing and fuselage stations with a capacity of 8,000–12,000 kg and provisions to carry combinations of:
    • Rockets:
      • S-8, S-13, S-25 rocket pods
    • Missiles:
      • R-27 (AA-10) air-to-air missile
      • R-73 (AA-11) air-to-air missile
      • R-77 (AA-12) air-to-air missile
      • Kh-29L/T (AS-14) air-to-ground missile
      • Kh-38 new generation air-to-ground missile with a range of 40 km
      • Kh-25MT/ML/MP (AS-10) air-to-ground missile or anti-radiation missile
      • Kh-59M (AS-18) air-to-ground missile
      • Kh-58 (AS-11) anti-radiation missile
      • Kh-31 (AS-17) anti-radiation or anti-ship missile
      • Kh-35 (AS-20) anti-ship missile
      • P-800 Oniks missile (SS-N-26 Strobile) anti-ship missile (version for the Air Force). Version he named “Alpha”weight of 1500 kg with a range of up to 300 km and a speed in the range of numbers M = 2.2-3.0. Officially not in service.
      • Kh-65SE or Kh-SD cruise missile
    • Bombs:
      • KAB-500L or KAB-500KR or KAB-1500L/KR guided bombs
      • OFAB-250-270, OFAB-100-120, FAB-500T, BETAB-500SHP, P-50T, ODAB-500PM unguided bombs, RBK-500 and SPBE-D cluster bombs, nuclear bombs.
    • Other:
      • 3,000 litres PTB-3000 Suspended Fuel Tanks, EW and reconnaissance pods.6

Source:Wikipedia; www.airforce-technology.com

Video and photos recorded during Vigilant Skies 2013 exercise

 

A live counter-terrorism exercise called Vigilant Skies 2013 was held in August 2013. to test the NATO-Russia Council (NRC) Cooperative Airspace Initiative (CAI) Information Exchange System.

The participants of exercise are Turkish, Polish and Russian fighter aircraft and air traffic controllers. Scenario is hijacking two civilian airplanes in Turkish, Russian and Polish airspace. All air traffic controllers coordinated fighters to do intercepting and escorting the airplane to landings.

Cooperative Airspace Initiative (CAI) is launched in 2002 to develop sharing air traffic information and communication capability to coordinate for scenarios like above mentioned, terrorist air security threats.

CAI network consist of 4 air traffic control stations in Nato countries and 4 in Russia, where they are connected by coordination centers in Warsaw and Moscow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prototype of Su-27 and whole Flanker family – T-10 Flanker A

T-10 Flanker A

Everything began at Sukhoi Bureau ending 1969. SSSR (USSR) needs some air superiority fighter to catch up USA FX program F-15 which started 1966.

T-10-20 at former Khodynka airbase

T-10-20 at former Khodynka airbase (click on photo to enlarge)

Prototype of the Su-27, factory code T-10 was finished September 1971. After concept was presented, Soviet Air Force heads decided to go parallel with two designs. One by Mikoyan lighter version (now well known Mig-29 Fulcrum), and heavier by Sukhoi.

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Development of the Su-27 was approved by Soviet government in 1976., so Sukhoi started to build first three T-10 prototypes (two for flight testing and one for structural testing). The first two flying prototypes of the Su-27 were fitted with AL-21FZAI engines.

Construction of the first prototype T10-1 was completed in April 1977. On 20 May 1977, the design bureau’s chief pilot V.S. Ilyushin performed the first flight. In May 1978, the testing programme was expanded to cover a second prototype, T10-2, and the year after that, in 1979, it received the prototypes T10-3 and T10-4, fitted with operational engines AL-31F. This was the first “unstable” fly-by-wire aircraft in the Soviet Union.

1st T-10 / Monino museum

1st T-10 / Monino museum (click on photo to enlarge)

In the summer of 1977, after Sukhoi’s chief pilot, Hero of the Soviet Union Vladimir Sergeyevich Ilyushin, made the first flight in the T-10, and testing began. All went well, and 10 more aircraft were begun.

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T-10-1 (click on photo to enlarge)

The second prototype T-10-2 was built in 1978, but it was destroyed on its second flight and the pilot was killed. The cause was shortcomings in the control system.

The same year Sukhoi built a third and a fourth prototype T-10-3 and T-10-4. They received new AL-31F engines, but the stability problems continued. Five new prototypes were built for expanded test flight program T-10-5, -6, -9, -10, -11. The seventh and the eight versions were kept on the drawing board waiting for possible changes. During the next four years the Su-27 underwent extensive redesign program under Mikhail Simonov’s supervision, which resulted in the T-10S, developed from the T-10-7.

P-42 record breaker

P-42 record breaker (click on photo to enlarge)

The T-10S was lost in an accident on September 3, 1981. The second T-10S came from the production line with designation T-10-12 and with new airframe structure. That prototype was lost too, on December 23, 1981. The plane broke down in a high-speed test and the pilot was killed. The T-10-8 prototype was assembled in 1982 to be used in strength tests. Thus the total number of aircraft in the test program rose to 14.

The T-10S prototype evolved into the production version Su-27P during the year 1985, when it was introduced to service. Sukhoi manufactured about 200 such planes for the Air Defense Force.

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The aircraft has been equipped with two AL-31F engines, with thrust of 12,500 kp with afterburner and 7,600 kp with the basic engine. The normal take-off weight is 22,000 kg.T-10-1_04

The radar is coherent RLPK27pulse-doppler radar, which is able to track 10 targets and engage 2 targets simultaneously. Geophysica NPO optical-electronic system supplements the radar. The system’s laser rangefinder has 8 km range and the IR finder’s detection range extends to as far as 50 km, depending on the IR contrast. The electro-optical system can be connected to the pilot’s helmet sight.

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Prototype of Su-27K (KUB) or lets say Su-33

 

As compared to the MiG-29, the benefits of the Su-27 in terms of operation range and useful load were evident. Thus the FrontalAviation soon directed its interest to the new aircraft and had ordered about 150 examples by the beginning of the 1990s.

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