Soviet airbase in Poland 1948.-1992. Stargard – Kluczewo

Air field Kluczewo (Polish: Lotnisko w Kluczewie, Lotnisko Kluczewo, also known as Lotnisko Stargard, in German: Fliegerhorst Stargard-Klützow or Fliegerhorst Klützow, in Russian: Ключево) was a military airfield 420 kilometers west-northwest of Warsaw, Poland.
The airfield was built in 1935 by the Luftwaffe as Fliegerhorst Stargard-Klützow in what was then German territory. It was a complete air base, with hangars, barracks, a weather station and all. Fuel and ammunition storage facilities were slightly off-base, along with a firing range. As was common at the time the airfield had its own connection to the national railway grid to ease resupplying.

Kluczewo Airfield - Poland 1990.

Kluczewo Airfield – Poland 1990.

In 1936 the airfield was home to the tactical reconnaissance squadrons I./ and II./112. By September 1939 this had changed to the Army Reconnaissance Group 21, flying Henschel HS126. In November 1939 Blind Flying School 2 (German: Blindflugschule2) moved to the airfield, but they returned to their original airfield by the following February. July 1940 brought another Blind Flying School: number 5, flying Ju-52/3m transports. They moved to Belgrade (Yugoslavia) in August 1941, and followed up by the Heavy Transport Flying Blindflugschule 8. Blindflugschule8 left for Brest (Belarus) in February 1943 however.

Su-27S, July 1992. Kluczewo - Poland

Su-27S, July 1992. Stargard-Kluczewo – Poland

After the flying schools had all left the airfield became a fighter base. On 6 October the airfield was severely bombed by US Eigth Air Force heavy bombers. Aside from its oval shaped flying field it also had a reinforced runway to its southwest. It was used from November 1944 by II./JG400 flying Me163 ‘Komets’, a rocket powered fighter. The unit did not progress beyond test flights, however. When the eastern front approached, they were quickly withdrawn to the west in December.
JG3 ‘Udet’, flying Focke Wulf FW190 Fighters was brought to the airfield on 25 January 1945 to counter Soviet attacks on the east front. Soviet forces kept pressing for the airfield however, and JG3 left on 6 February for Prenzlau. Shortly after the entire base was abandoned with the exeption of a 12-men demolition team. The first Soviet tanks reached the airfield on 8 February 1945, but they were repelled a few times before they took the airfield.

Last days of Flankers on this airfield, 2nd July 1992.

Just before leaving Poland, 2nd July 1992.

From 1945 until 1992 the airfield was used by the Soviet air force. They expanded the air base, and built hardened aircraft shelters and a small military town to house their personnel and their families. For quite a while the airfield operated several models of MiG-21, which were replaced by 39 modern Su-27 ‘Flankers’ (33 Su-27 fighters, 6 Su-27UB trainers) in 1988. The best known unit stationed at the airfield was the 159th ‘Red Banner of Novorossiysk’ Guards Fighter Aviation Regiment. The unit had been stationed at the airfield since 12 August 1964. Their final Flankers were withdrawn on 10 July 1992. After the last Russians left on 7 October 1992, the base was abandoned and it has since fallen into ruins.

 

Kluczewo 2003.

Kluczewo 2003.

Kluczewo 2009.

Kluczewo 2009.

source:www.forgottenairfields.com

Prototype of Su-27 and whole Flanker family – T-10 Flanker A

T-10 Flanker A

Everything began at Sukhoi Bureau ending 1969. SSSR (USSR) needs some air superiority fighter to catch up USA FX program F-15 which started 1966.

T-10-20 at former Khodynka airbase

T-10-20 at former Khodynka airbase (click on photo to enlarge)

Prototype of the Su-27, factory code T-10 was finished September 1971. After concept was presented, Soviet Air Force heads decided to go parallel with two designs. One by Mikoyan lighter version (now well known Mig-29 Fulcrum), and heavier by Sukhoi.

Sukhoi-T-10

Development of the Su-27 was approved by Soviet government in 1976., so Sukhoi started to build first three T-10 prototypes (two for flight testing and one for structural testing). The first two flying prototypes of the Su-27 were fitted with AL-21FZAI engines.

Construction of the first prototype T10-1 was completed in April 1977. On 20 May 1977, the design bureau’s chief pilot V.S. Ilyushin performed the first flight. In May 1978, the testing programme was expanded to cover a second prototype, T10-2, and the year after that, in 1979, it received the prototypes T10-3 and T10-4, fitted with operational engines AL-31F. This was the first “unstable” fly-by-wire aircraft in the Soviet Union.

1st T-10 / Monino museum

1st T-10 / Monino museum (click on photo to enlarge)

In the summer of 1977, after Sukhoi’s chief pilot, Hero of the Soviet Union Vladimir Sergeyevich Ilyushin, made the first flight in the T-10, and testing began. All went well, and 10 more aircraft were begun.

t-10

T-10-1 (click on photo to enlarge)

The second prototype T-10-2 was built in 1978, but it was destroyed on its second flight and the pilot was killed. The cause was shortcomings in the control system.

The same year Sukhoi built a third and a fourth prototype T-10-3 and T-10-4. They received new AL-31F engines, but the stability problems continued. Five new prototypes were built for expanded test flight program T-10-5, -6, -9, -10, -11. The seventh and the eight versions were kept on the drawing board waiting for possible changes. During the next four years the Su-27 underwent extensive redesign program under Mikhail Simonov’s supervision, which resulted in the T-10S, developed from the T-10-7.

P-42 record breaker

P-42 record breaker (click on photo to enlarge)

The T-10S was lost in an accident on September 3, 1981. The second T-10S came from the production line with designation T-10-12 and with new airframe structure. That prototype was lost too, on December 23, 1981. The plane broke down in a high-speed test and the pilot was killed. The T-10-8 prototype was assembled in 1982 to be used in strength tests. Thus the total number of aircraft in the test program rose to 14.

The T-10S prototype evolved into the production version Su-27P during the year 1985, when it was introduced to service. Sukhoi manufactured about 200 such planes for the Air Defense Force.

images

The aircraft has been equipped with two AL-31F engines, with thrust of 12,500 kp with afterburner and 7,600 kp with the basic engine. The normal take-off weight is 22,000 kg.T-10-1_04

The radar is coherent RLPK27pulse-doppler radar, which is able to track 10 targets and engage 2 targets simultaneously. Geophysica NPO optical-electronic system supplements the radar. The system’s laser rangefinder has 8 km range and the IR finder’s detection range extends to as far as 50 km, depending on the IR contrast. The electro-optical system can be connected to the pilot’s helmet sight.

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Prototype of Su-27K (KUB) or lets say Su-33

 

As compared to the MiG-29, the benefits of the Su-27 in terms of operation range and useful load were evident. Thus the FrontalAviation soon directed its interest to the new aircraft and had ordered about 150 examples by the beginning of the 1990s.

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