Su-27 / T-10 prototypes flying – video and something about!!! – 4 min of joy

May 20, 1977 the first prototype designated T10-1 took off. After an evaluation it was discovered that the T10-1 did not fulfil its requirements for maximum range, and manoeuvrability, and thus proved inferior to its western counterparts. The prototype had aerodynamics problems, engine problems and fuel consumption problems. The second prototype the T10-2 crashed because of a fly-by-wire software failure which resulted in the death of the test pilot. After such disappointing results the from the T10 program Sukhoi seemed to stop T10 development, because there were no more T10 prototypes tested. They didn’t, by 1981 a new design was introduced loosely based on the old T10. The new aircraft was designated T10S which was to become what today is known as the Su27 Flanker. The T10S prototype flew on April 20, 1981. The T10S showed it self to be a masterpiece of engineering having no equal anywhere in the world in range, manoeuvrability, and combat effectiveness.

The Su-27, a Russian fourth-generation single-seat supersonic fighter, is recognised all over the globe as one of the best combat aircraft of the 20th century. Due to its perfect flight performances and operational characteristics, the fighter is rightfully popular with pilots and technicians. Top piloting capabilities of the Su-27 fighter demonstrated during multiple air shows around the world did not leave anyone indifferent. The Su-27 is in the top lines of the aviation record tables of the International
Aircraft Federation. To the date, the Su-27 is a record-holder of 27 world class flight achievements. The Su-27 is the forefather of a combat aircraft family of various functionality, including the Su-27UB trainer, Su-27K ship-borne fighter (Su-33), Su-30 twin-seat interceptor, Su-30MK twin-seat multirole fighter, Su-34 tactical bombers Su-35, Su-37 Su-35BM and other high-manoeuvrability multirole aircraft.

More about T-10 prototype click HERE

About Yakovlev Yak-141 “Freestyle”

The Yakovlev Yak-141 (Яковлева Як-141; NATO reporting name “Freestyle”), also known as the Yak-41, was a supersonic vertical takeoff/landing(VTOL) fighter aircraft designed by Yakovlev. It was used for testing.

Freestyle was first supersonic VTOL aircraft in the world. 

Yak-141 has three engines. The main engine was served by four side-mounted ducts as well as a row of large louvers along the upper surface to allow air to enter the engine during full power hovering. This engine was the R-79V-300, a two-shaft augmented turbofan with a bypass ratio of 1. Maximum thrust was 14,000 kg (30,864 lb). The rear nozzle could rotate from 0 degrees to 95 degrees for VTOL landing and hovering. The two lift engines were the RD-41 design, a simple single-shaft engine made mostly of titanium. Each had a thrust of 4,100 kg (9,040 lb). The engines were installed behind the cockpit at an angle of 85 degrees. Like the Yak-38, the engines received their air through eight spring-operated dorsal flaps, and the exhaust exited through a belly opening covered by two ventral doors.

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Yakovlev obtained funding for four prototypes. The first (48-0, with no callsign) was a bare airframe for static and fatigue testing. The second (48-1, call sign “48”) was a non-flying powerplant testbed. The third and fourth (48-2 and 48-3, call signs “75” and “77”) were for flight testing. While 48-1 remained unpainted, 48-2 and 48-3 were painted in overall grey, with a black radome and fin cap antennas.

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Someone can say F-35 is a copy of Yak-141, and there is some truth. Lockheed was involved in this project, believe or not. Yakovlev stayed without funds to test more prototypes like Yak-41M, so they called few foreign companies to help them. Lockheed corporation (U.S.A.) was in the process of developing the X-35 for the US Joint Strike Fighter program then, so it was good for both sides to join knowledge and experience.

With Lockheed assistance, Yak-141 prototype 48-2 was displayed at the Farnborough Airshow in September 1992. Yakovlev announced that they had reached an agreement with Lockheed for funds of $385 to $400 million for three new prototypes and an additional static test aircraft to test improvements in design and avionics. Planned modifications for the proposed Yak-41M included an increase in STOL weight to 21,500 kg (47,400 lb). One of the prototypes would have been a dual-control trainer. Though no longer flyable, both 48-2 and 48-3 were exhibited at the 1993 Moscow airshow. The partnership began in late 1991, though it was not publicly revealed by Yakovlev until 6 September 1992, and was not revealed by Lockheed until June 1994.

Soviet supersonic VTOL Yak-41(141).

First flight of the Yak-141 was on 9 March 1987, program canceled in August 1991.

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 18.36 m (60 ft 2¼ in)
  • Wingspan: 10.105 m (33 ft 1½ in)
  • Height: 5.00 m (16 ft 5 in)
  • Wing area: 31.7 m² (341 ft²)
  • Empty weight: 11,650 kg (25,683 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 19,500 kg (42,989 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Soyuz R-79V-300 ( ru) lift/cruise turbofan
    • Dry thrust: 108 kN (24,300 lbf)
    • Thrust with afterburner: 152 kN (34,170 lbf)
  • Lift engines: 2x RKBM RD-41 (ru) turbojets 41.7 kN (9,300 lbf) thrust each)

yak-141

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 1,800 km/h (1,118 mph, Mach 1.4+)
  • Range: 2,100 km (1,305 mi)
  • Ferry range: 3,000 km (1,865 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 15,500 m (50,853 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 250m/s (15,000 m/min) (49,213 ft/min)

Armament

  • Guns: 1 × 30 mm GSh-301 cannon with 120 rounds
  • Hardpoints: 4 underwing and 1 fuselage hardpoints with a capacity of 2,600 kg (5,733 lb) of external stores and provisions to carry combinations of:
    • Missiles: R-73 Archer, R-77 Adder or R-27 Alamo air-to-air missiles

Yakovlev_Yak-141_at_1992_Farnborough_Videan

An-124 Ruslan and Su-27s

The Antonov An-124 Ruslan (NATO reporting name: Condor) is a strategic airlift jet aircraft. It was designed by the Antonov design bureau in the Ukrainian SSR, then part of the Soviet Union. The An-124 is the world’s highest gross weight production cargo aeroplane and second heaviest operating cargo aircraft, behind the one-off Antonov An-225.

General characteristics

  • Crew: 4–6 (pilot, copilot, navigator, senior flight engineer (+flight engineer, radio man) + 2 loadmasters)
  • Capacity: 88 passengers or the hold can take an additional 350 on a palletised seating system
  • Payload: 150,000 kg (330,000 lb)
  • Length: 68.96 m (226 ft 3 in)
  • Wingspan: 73.3 m (240 ft 5 in)
  • Height: 20.78 m (68 ft 2 in)
  • Wing area: 628 m² (6,760 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 175,000 kg (385,000 lb)
  • Loaded weight: 405,000 kg (893,000 lb)
  • Useful load: 230,000 kg (508,000 lb)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 405,000 kg (893,000 lb)
  • Powerplant: 4 × Ivchenko Progress D-18T turbofans, 229.5 kN (51,600 lbf) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 865 km/h (467 kn (537 mph))
  • Cruise speed: 800–850 km/h (430 kn (490 mph))
  • Range: 5,200 km (2,808 nm, 3231 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 12,000 m (39,370 ft)
  • Wing loading: 365 kg/m² (74.7 lb/sq ft)
  • Thrust/weight: 0.23
  • Take-off run distance (maximum take-off weight): 2,520 m (8,270 ft)
  • Landing roll distance at maximum landing weight: 900 m (3,000 ft)

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Su-27 vs. P3B Orion over Barents Sea 1987. – intercepting and collision

One of the first photos, ever of Su-27, took The Royal Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) Orion P3B. Su-27 Flanker was still unknown fighter jet for West military world.

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Situation was very critical over Barents Sea. In P3B were pilot and 9 crew members, when Su-27 intercepted them. It was on 13th September 1987. Su-27 was from 941st IAP V-PVO, Kirlip-YAVR Air base, pilot Vasiliy Tsymbal.

Orion was at 13.000ft (about 4.500m) when noticed, for the 1st time, Su-27 Flanker, on left side of the Orion, near left wing. Flanker done a close pass and Norwegians took few photos. Pilot of the Su-27 flanker had problems to keep his machine in close formation with very slow Orion, so decided to disappear. Pilot of the Orion decided to decelerate to show his dislike for too much close flying of the Flanker, so Flanker needed to accelerated away.

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Showing the armament to Orions crew

Few minutes later, same Flanker back, and again was in same, similar close position to Orion P3B. Pilot of the Orion again decreased the speed, sends signals to Su-27 pilot to step away from them. So, again Flanker disappeared.

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Flankers pilot was very close to P3B Orion

20 minutes later, same Flanker showed up, for the 3rd time, and now on right side, close to right wing of the Orion. Su-27 slowly moved closer and  closer to the Orion. Flanker pilot obviously intending to disappear again. He did disappearing, but Flanker was underneath the Orion, so during pulling up, his left tail hit the engine prop , cutting one piece of it which finished in fuselage and that caused decompression in Orion.

``Hello`` with 6 x R-27 missiles

“Hello“ with 6 x R-27 missiles

 

1_73636665_Su-27 122Then Flanker done a hard left turn and disappeared finally and safely returned to the Air base. This Flanker fighter got kill mark in the form of black P3B Orion silhouette, behind the canopy, and kept this kill mark even bort number was changed from 36 to 38, during 1990.

The crew of the Orion declared an emergency and dropped down to 10.000ft. None of the crew was injured, and several minutes later two F-16As of the Norwegian Air Force appeared to escort the P-3B safely back to Banak AB.

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The damaged engine no. 1 of the P-3B was turned off and the damage on the propeller can be seen

 

 

Soviet airbase in Poland 1948.-1992. Stargard – Kluczewo

Air field Kluczewo (Polish: Lotnisko w Kluczewie, Lotnisko Kluczewo, also known as Lotnisko Stargard, in German: Fliegerhorst Stargard-Klützow or Fliegerhorst Klützow, in Russian: Ключево) was a military airfield 420 kilometers west-northwest of Warsaw, Poland.
The airfield was built in 1935 by the Luftwaffe as Fliegerhorst Stargard-Klützow in what was then German territory. It was a complete air base, with hangars, barracks, a weather station and all. Fuel and ammunition storage facilities were slightly off-base, along with a firing range. As was common at the time the airfield had its own connection to the national railway grid to ease resupplying.

Kluczewo Airfield - Poland 1990.

Kluczewo Airfield – Poland 1990.

In 1936 the airfield was home to the tactical reconnaissance squadrons I./ and II./112. By September 1939 this had changed to the Army Reconnaissance Group 21, flying Henschel HS126. In November 1939 Blind Flying School 2 (German: Blindflugschule2) moved to the airfield, but they returned to their original airfield by the following February. July 1940 brought another Blind Flying School: number 5, flying Ju-52/3m transports. They moved to Belgrade (Yugoslavia) in August 1941, and followed up by the Heavy Transport Flying Blindflugschule 8. Blindflugschule8 left for Brest (Belarus) in February 1943 however.

Su-27S, July 1992. Kluczewo - Poland

Su-27S, July 1992. Stargard-Kluczewo – Poland

After the flying schools had all left the airfield became a fighter base. On 6 October the airfield was severely bombed by US Eigth Air Force heavy bombers. Aside from its oval shaped flying field it also had a reinforced runway to its southwest. It was used from November 1944 by II./JG400 flying Me163 ‘Komets’, a rocket powered fighter. The unit did not progress beyond test flights, however. When the eastern front approached, they were quickly withdrawn to the west in December.
JG3 ‘Udet’, flying Focke Wulf FW190 Fighters was brought to the airfield on 25 January 1945 to counter Soviet attacks on the east front. Soviet forces kept pressing for the airfield however, and JG3 left on 6 February for Prenzlau. Shortly after the entire base was abandoned with the exeption of a 12-men demolition team. The first Soviet tanks reached the airfield on 8 February 1945, but they were repelled a few times before they took the airfield.

Last days of Flankers on this airfield, 2nd July 1992.

Just before leaving Poland, 2nd July 1992.

From 1945 until 1992 the airfield was used by the Soviet air force. They expanded the air base, and built hardened aircraft shelters and a small military town to house their personnel and their families. For quite a while the airfield operated several models of MiG-21, which were replaced by 39 modern Su-27 ‘Flankers’ (33 Su-27 fighters, 6 Su-27UB trainers) in 1988. The best known unit stationed at the airfield was the 159th ‘Red Banner of Novorossiysk’ Guards Fighter Aviation Regiment. The unit had been stationed at the airfield since 12 August 1964. Their final Flankers were withdrawn on 10 July 1992. After the last Russians left on 7 October 1992, the base was abandoned and it has since fallen into ruins.

 

Kluczewo 2003.

Kluczewo 2003.

Kluczewo 2009.

Kluczewo 2009.

source:www.forgottenairfields.com

American officer in Su-33

A Russian Navy officer explains his aircraft to a visiting U.S. Navy officer while the aircraft sits on the flight deck of the Russian Aircraft Carrier Adm. Kuznetsov as it steamed in the Mediterranean Sea on Jan. 7, 1996. The aircraft carrier became the meeting place for the First Deputy Commander of the Russian Navy and the Commander of the U.S. Navy’s Sixth Fleet. Russian Adm. Igor Kasatonov invited Vice Adm. Donald L. Pilling, U.S. Navy, aboard the Russian carrier to discuss potential professional contacts between the two navies during the Adm. Kuznetsov deployment in the Mediterranean. The American delegation was hosted to a tour of the ship, a display of embarked aircraft and a traditional Russian meal. The Russian carrier is in the Mediterranean to show the flag and help commemorate the Russian Navy’s 300th anniversary.

American officer in Su-33

Prototype of Su-27 and whole Flanker family – T-10 Flanker A

T-10 Flanker A

Everything began at Sukhoi Bureau ending 1969. SSSR (USSR) needs some air superiority fighter to catch up USA FX program F-15 which started 1966.

T-10-20 at former Khodynka airbase

T-10-20 at former Khodynka airbase (click on photo to enlarge)

Prototype of the Su-27, factory code T-10 was finished September 1971. After concept was presented, Soviet Air Force heads decided to go parallel with two designs. One by Mikoyan lighter version (now well known Mig-29 Fulcrum), and heavier by Sukhoi.

Sukhoi-T-10

Development of the Su-27 was approved by Soviet government in 1976., so Sukhoi started to build first three T-10 prototypes (two for flight testing and one for structural testing). The first two flying prototypes of the Su-27 were fitted with AL-21FZAI engines.

Construction of the first prototype T10-1 was completed in April 1977. On 20 May 1977, the design bureau’s chief pilot V.S. Ilyushin performed the first flight. In May 1978, the testing programme was expanded to cover a second prototype, T10-2, and the year after that, in 1979, it received the prototypes T10-3 and T10-4, fitted with operational engines AL-31F. This was the first “unstable” fly-by-wire aircraft in the Soviet Union.

1st T-10 / Monino museum

1st T-10 / Monino museum (click on photo to enlarge)

In the summer of 1977, after Sukhoi’s chief pilot, Hero of the Soviet Union Vladimir Sergeyevich Ilyushin, made the first flight in the T-10, and testing began. All went well, and 10 more aircraft were begun.

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T-10-1 (click on photo to enlarge)

The second prototype T-10-2 was built in 1978, but it was destroyed on its second flight and the pilot was killed. The cause was shortcomings in the control system.

The same year Sukhoi built a third and a fourth prototype T-10-3 and T-10-4. They received new AL-31F engines, but the stability problems continued. Five new prototypes were built for expanded test flight program T-10-5, -6, -9, -10, -11. The seventh and the eight versions were kept on the drawing board waiting for possible changes. During the next four years the Su-27 underwent extensive redesign program under Mikhail Simonov’s supervision, which resulted in the T-10S, developed from the T-10-7.

P-42 record breaker

P-42 record breaker (click on photo to enlarge)

The T-10S was lost in an accident on September 3, 1981. The second T-10S came from the production line with designation T-10-12 and with new airframe structure. That prototype was lost too, on December 23, 1981. The plane broke down in a high-speed test and the pilot was killed. The T-10-8 prototype was assembled in 1982 to be used in strength tests. Thus the total number of aircraft in the test program rose to 14.

The T-10S prototype evolved into the production version Su-27P during the year 1985, when it was introduced to service. Sukhoi manufactured about 200 such planes for the Air Defense Force.

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The aircraft has been equipped with two AL-31F engines, with thrust of 12,500 kp with afterburner and 7,600 kp with the basic engine. The normal take-off weight is 22,000 kg.T-10-1_04

The radar is coherent RLPK27pulse-doppler radar, which is able to track 10 targets and engage 2 targets simultaneously. Geophysica NPO optical-electronic system supplements the radar. The system’s laser rangefinder has 8 km range and the IR finder’s detection range extends to as far as 50 km, depending on the IR contrast. The electro-optical system can be connected to the pilot’s helmet sight.

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Prototype of Su-27K (KUB) or lets say Su-33

 

As compared to the MiG-29, the benefits of the Su-27 in terms of operation range and useful load were evident. Thus the FrontalAviation soon directed its interest to the new aircraft and had ordered about 150 examples by the beginning of the 1990s.

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